Revenge, Miracles & True Love: “The Princess Bride” Movie Rewatch

Revenge, Miracles & True Love: “The Princess Bride” Movie Rewatch

“Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”

– Mandy Patinkin (Inigo Montoya) in The Princess Bride

While living in Honolulu in 2012, the Consolidated Theaters in Ward Entertainment Center hosted a Throwback Thursday event where they showcased a classic film each Thursday night. One week was Jaws, and another was Pulp Fiction, and so on. As you might imagine, I was curious which film they would show next. An opportunity to see a movie in the theater I never had the chance to see when it originally premiered was an opportunity I welcomed. Every month, the theater unveiled its schedule for each Throwback Thursday, but I was rarely motivated by the selections. It’s not that those they showcased didn’t deserve the “throwback attention.” Of course, each film did!

Several months into the event, the theater announced a movie I was eager to see. The scheduled film included themes of true love, inconceivable moments, fire swamps, miracles, pirates, and revenge. The Princess Bride is one of my all-time favorite films. Sure, I have spoken of nostalgic films and use these terms liberally, but while countless movies have provided me joy, there is no film like The Princess Bride. But it premiered when I was too young, so I never saw it in a theater, only on VHS. When I asked my wife if she would join me to see The Princess Bride, she said, “sure, I have never seen it anyhow.”

In shock I quickly bought tickets and remedied one of the biggest surprises of our relationship. My wife had never seen The Princess Bride. Somehow, I had missed this terrible truth. At the beautiful theater in Honolulu, I finally watched a beloved film on a screen far larger than my family’s television of 19 inches in the early ‘90s. So, let me rewind the VHS, press start over on my Disney+ account, and scan your ticket to a conversation about a movie that made masks cool, rotten miracles acceptable, and other narrated films bend the knee. We are “stormin’ da” castle… The Princess Bride.

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AutoCamp Cape Cod: Airstream Vacation & Rewinding 1988’s “The Great Outdoors”

AutoCamp Cape Cod: Airstream Vacation & Rewinding 1988’s “The Great Outdoors”

“Some national parks have long waiting lists for camping reservations. When you have to wait a year to sleep next to a tree, something is wrong.”

– George Carlin

The time finally arrived; my wife and I took a trip away from home for the first time in over a year. We took a two-night venture to Falmouth, Massachusetts, and stayed in an Airstream at AutoCamp Cape Cod. I am not much of a camper. Even so, staying in an Airstream seemed a perfect way to spend a couple of nights but still enjoying all the luxuries of travel. We would be outside, away from others, and could bring our dog, Mr. Tuttles. It seemed a perfect way to reacclimate to the outside world. If I have learned anything recently, it is that in a pandemic experienced world, anything is possible.

But was it a trip I would do again? Did sleeping in an Airstream help me see the outdoors as a viable alternative to resort amenities? Keep reading to see, but here is a hint; this anti-camper not only recalled memories of childhood but could also not stop quoting a ‘88 John Candy film. Sure, while I do not consider myself “obnoxious,” I am slightly more the Roman character played by Dan Aykroyd in The Great Outdoors than Chet played by Candy. A classic comedy from 1988 written by John Hughes, the outdoors always makes me think of this film. So, buckle up, get the fire pit ready, and dust off the VHS player. We are talking camping, travel, and a classic cinematic comedy.

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Visual History: Field Trips & Sentimental New England Museums

Visual History: Field Trips & Sentimental New England Museums

“Living is like tearing through a museum. Not until later do you really start absorbing what you saw, thinking about it, looking it up in a book, and remembering – because you can’t take it in all at once.”

– Aubrey Hepburn

I continue to reflect on those things that brought me joy, whether toys or food. One thing I have not discussed is museums. There is no need to worry; I will not put on my historian hat today, but instead recall those places filled with artifacts, history, and have inspired, moved, and awoken me to the larger, more complex world. As an adult, I have both different and similar viewpoints about those museums or historical sites I traveled to and observed as a child and adolescent. It is interesting to remember those places I went at a young age with the lived experience and the years of museum visits I have since stockpiled.

Today, I seek to engage in nostalgia once again, but with “field trips” as my focus, as well as those museums that I cannot forget, like Battleship Cove in Fall River, Massachusetts. One foot in the past, the other in the present, I hope to respect the educational pursuits that inspired me and the various museum visits that moved me. Sure, I won’t discuss every trip or visit a historical site or museum but rather build a narrative of the moments I think of most often. As the pandemic continues, diving into my nostalgic past has brought great comfort. Like my post on food and toys, and to an extent, music, and movies, here I take on public history.

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“This is Baseball, You Gotta Stop Thinking!”: Baseball in Life & Cinema

“This is Baseball, You Gotta Stop Thinking!”: Baseball in Life & Cinema

Jimmy Dugan: Sneaking out like this, quitting, you’ll regret it for the rest of your life. Baseball is what gets inside you. It’s what lights you up, you can’t deny that. / Dottie Hinson: It just got too hard. / Jimmy Dugan: It’s supposed to be hard. If it wasn’t hard, everyone would do it. The hard… is what makes it great.”

– Tom Hanks (Dugan) & Geena Davis (Hinson) in A League of Their Own

April 1, tomorrow, marks the beginning of the MLB season in America. As an individual ready for a slight return to normalcy, baseball is the great American pastime. I am deeply nostalgic about baseball, more so than any other sport. It’s as if, once spring is sprung, the smell in the air and feel of the environment demand that players take the field to participate in the American pastime. Days like today, the eve of the start of a new MLB season, remind me of my love of baseball and my enjoyment of movies with baseball as an underlining theme. I grew up watching baseball films, and they are plausibly the first type of sports-themed films I fell in love with, thus molding my cinematic experience for the rest of my life. There are films with powerful, uplifting moments that allow them to transcend their above-average status and become legendary. So, let’s talk baseball, both on the field and the cinematic screen.

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Video Game Nostalgia & Returning to “Borderlands 3”

Video Game Nostalgia & Returning to “Borderlands 3”

“The obvious objective of video games is to entertain people by surprising them with new experiences.”

– Shigeru Miyamoto

Nostalgia has often served as a vehicle to allow me to peel back the curtain and explore topics like music, food, movies, and toys. Today, I do it again, but this time with a nod towards video games, which I briefly explored before. I discussed my fascination with Borderlands 3 on PlayStation in July. In A Newcomer Joins Borderlands 3, I elaborated on how my brother-in-law Kyle bought me the game, and we constantly played online throughout the pandemic and still today. Yes, we have bested the competition, crushed the newly released DLC, and go back to Sanctuary III with every expansion. Borderlands 3 has come to define what I look for in a video game.

I am not a gamer and do not pretend to be an expert. Seriously though, I am terrible at Borderlands 3, but it doesn’t matter. If I destroy ten cars and fall off every cliff, I will continue to enjoy the experience. As Kyle and I continue to explore Borderlands 3, it had me thinking; what are my favorite video games, and how do they compare to my newfound favorite? So, I chose to go back, briefly, to Borderlands 3 and explore those video games that left an impression on my gameplay as a child, a teenager, and a nearly forty-year-old adult who refuses to put down the controller. Maybe it’s the nonstop laughing, or perhaps it’s who the games connect me to, but no matter, let’s hit play.

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“Rocky Mountain High”: John Denver & Traveling to Denver, CO for 13.1 Miles of Running

“Rocky Mountain High”: John Denver & Traveling to Denver, CO for 13.1 Miles of Running

“But the Colorado rocky mountain high
I’ve seen it rainin’ fire in the sky
The shadow from the starlight is softer than a lullabye
Rocky mountain high”

– John Denver “Rocky Mountain High”

The other day was gorgeous outside, with the sun shining and 65°F. I mean, it could have been 50°F, and, as a New Englander, I would have thrown on shorts and celebrated! The temperature was incredible, and the snow finally melted. I went for a run, and along the way, as I allowed myself to fall deep into thought, I reflected on my favorite half marathons. I have spoken of them before on this blog, but my memory kept bringing me back to Denver, CO. The Rock n’ Roll Denver Half Marathon is one of the best races I have ever run, and I mentioned it in an August 2020 post. Denver is a fantastic city, and this was an awesome trip.

As I mentioned in one of last month’s posts, “No Sleep Till Brooklyn!”, my brother Jeff promised that if we ran the Rock n’ Roll Brooklyn race in 2016, he would support me in selecting a race destination, further away, in 2017. Knowing exactly where I wanted to go and supported by a series of welcomed cosmic occurrences, the stars seemed to align. I went to Jeff with my request to run in Denver. Join me as I explore the city, the race once again, but honestly, for the first time, first observing the emotional connection that sparked my need to visit the city and see the mountains I had read about, or more importantly, heard about in songs.

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